Комплект. Браслет и клипсы. Чарм-браслет. Монеты. Coro. США.

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Описание

Изделие очень известной американской марки Coro. Был выпущен гид для коллекционеров винтажных украшений Coro с публикациями изделий (на последнем фото).

Винтажный комплект американской марки Coro. Браслет и клипсы с монетами. Изображение гербов на монетах с эмалью. Фирменный бумажный тег, клейма. В идеальной сохранности.  Длина браслета 18.5 см. Всего 7 монет на браслете. Длина клипс 4 см. 70-е годы. США.

Винтажные украшения с клеймами более высоко ценятся чем те, что без клейма. На стоимость влияет возраст, сохранность, марка-производитель.

CORO/COHN AND ROSENBERGER c. 1900-1979

Coro jewelry, Cohn & Rosenberger, was founded in New York by Emanuel Cohn & Carl Rosenberger in 1901/1902 & incorporated in 1913.  A factory was established in Providence, RI in 1911.   With offices or plants in New York & Providence; at times they had a presence in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Miami, Toronto, England and Mexico.  Great Britain mechanical patents have been found in the name of Corocraft from 1961 until 1969, which documents actual production in England (courtesy Mary Walden-Till).

Cohn died in 1910, but the name remained Cohn & Rosenberger.  The corporate name “Coro” was adopted in 1943.  Rosenberger died in 1957, & his son Gerald, who succeded him, died in 1967.

In 1969 the family sold 51% of the Coro stock to Richton, Intl. Corp., who bought the remaining stock in 1970.  Richton also owned the Oscar de la Renta brand.  By 1979 all the Coro companies, except the Canadian company, were bankrupt. It was sold to a South American company in 1992 & also went backrupt.

Gene Verri was the head designer and personally responsible for many, many of Coro’s famous designs.
Adolph Katz signed many of the patents only as a representative of the company.  Information confirmed by Ron Verri , Gene’s son — 9/8/05.

Designers for Coro according to Brunialti:
Gene Verrecchia [Verri] –1933 to the end of the 1963 (he and his son Ron own Gem-Craft)
Charles E. Pauzat–1939-1940’s
Oscar Frank Placco –1934-1945?
Robert Geissman–1938
Sidney Pearl–1941
Carol McDonald–1940
Lester Gaba–1941
Marion Weeber –1940-1941
Victor di Mezza–1950

Coro manufactured most of their own jewelry. However, when needed, they would have other companies make some of their jewelry. Hedison manufactured some jewelry for Coro. Catamore manufactured all Coro’s “precious metal” jewelry, until about 1970 when Coro started making their own.

CORO/COROCRAFT/FRANCOIS/VENDOME: 1901- Present (Still Operates in Canada)

Emanuel Cohn and Gerard Rosenberg opened a small shop in New York selling jewelry and personal accessories, later becoming known as “Coro”. The name Coro incorporates the first two letters of each partner’s name. Mark, in the beginning: “CR”. By the mid 1920’s, the Coro company was the largest manufacturer of costume jewelry and had a work force of over 2,000. The company produced a broad range of designs and an immense volume of jewelry at all price levels. Some pins sold in five-and-dime stores for as low as 50 cents and some pins sold as high as $100 in speciality stores. Some of the rhinestone studded Coro jewelry can be compare with the very best produced by other costume jewelry companies. The well designed pieces of the 1930s-1950s including the duettes and figurals with a clear Lucite central stone known as “jelly belly”, the enameled tremblers, the whimsical designs by Adolph Katz, and the Mexican sterling pieces are highly collectible. Marks: some signed “Corocraft”, some signed ” Francois” (this mark was used to market the higher end line of costume jewelry to the wealthier clients until World War II), most signed “Vendome” (a jewelry line starting in 1944 which was to be their highest line of costume jewelry), “Coro”, used since 1919, some with year produced, ” Coro Craft” since 1937 used for higher end pieces, “Corocraft” used after WWII, “Pegasus” used after WWII and “Coro Originals” to name a few of a long list of Coro markings. Coro ceased production in the U.S. in 1979. Coro Inc. in Canada is still in operation today.